Tag: traditional

A Song Selection

(Stick with me. I go somewhere at the end.)

I am the Director of Music at our church. Part of that job includes choosing music for our services. We are a diverse Pentecostal church, diverse in age, shade of skin, nation of origin, rural/metro mindset, denomination of childhood, etc. Since music is a very cultural thing, basically that means I can never make everyone happy. Sometimes I can make some people happy. I do try to draw us into a mindset of praise and worship, away from the distractions of life to a place where we can focus our attention on God.

I’ve spent much of the day combing through music in an effort to add a few songs to our repertoire. I have a list as long as my arm of songs I’ve jotted down at different times to check out later. Today I tackled part of that list.

Some of those songs on that list are old songs, either choruses or hymns. The old hymns are very effective for us, so I perk up when I hear one I have neglected to integrate. There are other old choruses that I also want to put in. Our young folks don’t necessarily have to know they’re old, and the elders will appreciate it. 😊

But today I was looking for something more contemporary to add to the mix, so I combed through tons of the new music that has most recently been put out.

There are several things I have to consider musically, as we are a congregation who still sings en masse and doesn’t just watch the folks on the platform sing. (There is also no smoke, and we leave the house lights fully up. That’s another topic for another day.)

The range must be about an octave or less or we lose folks. For example, “Shout to the Lord” was a great song, but only about 3 people could sing all the notes, so we never sang it at Newark UPC. Things have gotten better in this area, but there are a few that still hit the rubbish bin for unreachable range.

We don’t have 3 electric and 2 bass guitars. In fact we don’t have any guitars. (We have a banjo that gets played when it fits the musical style, which I think is really cool. Who else has a banjo? We also have violin, cello, French horn, clarinet, and Hammond organ.) So some of the anthems or songs with a heavy beat just sound all wrong with our instrumentation. Some songs sound great with a full band and a stadium of thousands of voices that just won’t work with our Sunday 170. So they get scrapped too.

A lot of the songs released recently have a syncopated beat. I guess songwriters think it sounds old-fashioned to write songs that have words on actual beats. But when you have a congregation of people without sheet music in front of them, and if they had sheet music they couldn’t read it well enough for it to do anything but cause confusion, there has to be some kind of easily attainable pattern where the words fit the beat, the offbeat, the sometimes beat… They have to hit SOMETHING. But many of the songs sung today would require several rehearsals and lots of whiteboard instruction to teach the people where the words go. Not happening. Moving on.

But the thing that gets me most, (as they say in Oklahoma, it gets in my craw. What is a craw, anyway?), makes me scrap more songs than anything, is that so many of the songs put out lately are about a moment of pleasure. Let me elaborate. It seems the purpose of the song is to create an atmosphere where we feel really great in God’s presence for a while, a heaven-on-earth moment that tickles our fancy. It seems we’ve moved from Jesus-is-my-boyfriend songs to Jesus-come-make-me-feel-good songs. I heard one person liken these song to what it would sound like if we were trying to get a small kitten to enter a room. The focus is totally first-person, totally me and I. I want… I need… If there is a “You” it is about “You can do this thing for me.”

Jesus is my Savior. He is worthy of all my worship. He doesn’t need to do anything more for me. I owe Him all. I want to focus on the cross, heaven, how He loves me, how I love Him, how amazing He is, His holiness, His grace, surrendering my will to Him… I do not require of Him that He come down and make me feel great. It so happens that often in the process of worshiping and praising Him He DOES make me feel great. It would be okay for an occasional song or two to have this theme. They’re not new; they can be found going way back if you look. But we’re talking way more than “an occasional song” here. Way more.

It makes me wonder if the problem isn’t actually just our songs but goes far deeper than that. Songs usually come as a reflection of what is going on in our culture, in our churches, in our hearts. Have we become so shallow that all we want is a spiritual high? A moment with a lover that we then toss aside for the rest of the week until we come back next Sunday and do it again? Dear God, if that is the case, forgive us. Help us not forgo the ongoing relationship for a momentary joy. Help us not trade the progressive discipleship for an event in time. Forgive us for forgetting your Amazing Grace. Help us to Surrender All, to remember Oh, How I Love Jesus, to rejoice in the Blessed Assurance that It Is Well With My Soul. Bring us back to being Near the Cross, The Old Rugged Cross. We know that Great Is Thy Faithfulness, and indeed, How Great Thou Art!

Worship Styles: Principles of Participation

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I would like to share my opinions and observations of what has changed in church music services and what has come of those changes. I’d like to apply the principles introduced in my last post, What’s The Point, to the topic of songs in church.

What is the point of a church worship service? Everyone involved in a service in any way should know what their goal is. The way I see it, my goal as a musician involved in the service, (besides personally worshiping my Lord and Savior, which is the most important goal of all) is to facilitate and contribute to others worshiping of our Lord Jesus Christ. The music department is most successful when its contribution leads the congregation into a place of worship where the music is no longer necessary and the focus is totally on the Lord. If I do my job well, the congregation will hardly notice I’m there, and at the end of the process I will no longer be needed. I am not THE worship service; I am simply an usher arranging a meeting between the people in the congregation and God.

Something happened again a few Sundays ago that has happened many times before. We had some visitors from out-of-town, and following church they said what many of our out-of-town visitors say: “We enjoyed your songs SOOOO MUCH!” and “We felt comfortable singing the words, and everyone else was singing!” and “The words of those songs are so POWERFUL!” and “It was so refreshing to hear an ORGAN again.”

We have not set out to be old-fashioned. We’re not trying to be different. We have just kept doing what was effective in leading the congregation to a place of worship. We didn’t change just for the sake of changing. I regularly introduce different songs into our worship services. Some are old hymns we haven’t sung before. Some are new choruses written within the past few years. Some are choruses, but are very old. The ones that work, I keep in the rotation; songs that aren’t effective to meet our goals, I nix after a few tries.

On the Sunday morning that was so splendid for our visitors, 3 of the 5 songs we sang came from the hymnal. We projected the words, but they were exactly the same as we have been singing for years, yea even decades. We also sang an old chorus written a very long time ago, and a newer chorus that I have introduced within the past year. Of the 5 songs, the one that was most strained and least effective was the newest one. It probably won’t last too long.

Now let’s move to a completely different format. Every time I attend the Philadelphia Orchestra, I look over the program ahead of time and hope against hope that the classics are on the program. Give me some Bach, some Schubert, some Beethoven. Please, oh please, let it not be the world premiere of a piece newly commissioned by the orchestra. No Schoenberg please, or something written in 7/4 time using the 12 tone scale. Yes, I understand that it’s legitimate music, but I don’t like it. I’ve tried; I just can’t. I don’t have anything against NEW music. During 1999 and 2000 I had season tickets to the Philly Orchestra as they did an entire season of music written in the 1900’s, and I enjoyed most of it: composers like Ravel, Copland, and Sibelius. I just can’t get a handle on the more abstract stuff. I can’t find any pattern in the melody; the rhythm seems forced. When I hear one of these pieces I feel like standing up like the little boy in the Hans Christian Anderson tale and saying, “The Emperor Has No Clothes!” Except I would be standing up and saying, “That sounds awful!”

I have been in modern worship services time and time again that lead me to know why these people from out-of-town were so thirsty for our type of music. I have wanted so many times to stand up and say, “This is not effective!” so that’s what I’m doing right here, right now.

In this newer format, there are somewhere between 6-10 singers on the platform, each with a microphone, singing in harmony. One of these singers is the leader, singing solo parts, adding extra ad-lib words and notes. The leader is not really leading the congregation, but leading the praise singers in the role of a soloist. If you watch the congregation, very few of the people are singing. Those who are attempting to do so frequently lose track of the music and words. There is no need for the congregation. They are welcome to join in, but they certainly aren’t contributing anything, and all but the best singers feel they are interfering with the good music.

Many, if not most, of the songs in these services were originally written to be sung in mega-churches meeting in arenas. A congregation of 30 or even 100 in a small sanctuary can not sound the same as a congregation of 10,000 in an arena, so the songs often sound out-of-place and awkward.

The words are projected, but the structure of the songs is so complicated that the A/V people often have trouble knowing what to project and they put up the wrong words. The rhythm of the words is relaxed to the point where it’s hard to know what is to be said when. The words are formatted like poetry and there are no actual notes to help show (even if you don’t read music) that some words are held longer than others. This also makes it more difficult to know what word should be said when. The accented words are often not in the typical pattern of beats one and three for 2/4 or 4/4 time or beat one for 3/4, etc. The accent may very well be on the 2nd half of the 1st and 3rd beats. Because of this rhythm, many of the songs require skilled bass and drum players to get anywhere near the intended effect.

Using the projector has allowed worship leaders to introduce a constant flow of new music. Since we are no longer tied to a printed hymn book, we can put in new music on a consistent basis. Because of this, the songs are often foreign to the congregation.

The topic of these songs is often very shallow and ambiguous. “How wonderful it is for us to worship Him” is the focus. The older songs, as a general rule, deal more with experiences and how good God is to us throughout them. The template for many of them is a verse about where He brought us from, a couple of verses about how He brings us through our current struggles, and a last verse about how He’s taking us to heaven. The contemporary songs are primarily emotional: an escape from the life we live outside of the church. Songs focusing on the blood of Jesus are few and far between, and a mention of heaven is extremely rare. Any acknowledgement of changes-for-the-better He makes in our lives are also scarce. The words are usually not doctrinally deep. Rarely is any difficulty in life acknowledged.

The difference between a performance and a worship service is participation. Concerts are fine in a concert context, but I have found them to be much less effective in ushering me to a place of concentration on God than a context where I’m speaking the words, singing the notes, and being a part of the process.

So if the topic of the songs is shallow, the beat is hard to follow, the projection isn’t reliably the right words, the structure is complicated, and the congregation isn’t needed, it’s no wonder the congregation feels unneeded and left behind. How is this the best environment for worship? The goal is compromised. After all, “What’s the Point?”